How Schools Can Involve Stakeholders in Reducing Bullying

De Luca, L., Nocentini, A., & Menesini, E. (2019). The teacher’s role in preventing bullying. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, 1830. Web.

The authors provide the ways schools can assist educators in handling bullying in school. First, they mention that educators should react in several ways when bullying occurs. They could either intervene, observe the situation, ignore, or trivialize the bullying (De Luca et al., 2019). Educators can apply these interventions if the recommendations are supported within their policies to ensure they are protected when implementing the preventative measures.

This article provides an accurate proposal on the school’s engagement in implementing protection laws that can support the implementation of the intervention (De Luca et al., 2019). The author observed that the current mechanisms are ineffective, concluding that better interventions for this menace should include force where necessary. One weakness also identified is that articles used to support claims are outdated. Contrary to what De Luca et al. (2019) mentions as a counteractive mechanism for bullying, Bosworth et al. (2018) have a different opinion indicating that changing the school climate is what every stakeholder should do to discourage bullying. Therefore, parents, educators, and the community should radically change school culture by instilling new norms that encourage discipline and responsibility among students.

Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Sheldon, S. B., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Williams, K. J. (2018). School, family, and community partnerships: Your handbook for action. Corwin Press.

This book provides strategies for educators, families, and the community to apply to help reduce bullying in school. Concepts presented include communication, volunteering, decision-making, and collaboration. The mentioned stakeholders are expected to communicate with the students concerning bullying at their distinctive places (Epstein et al., 2018). For instance, parents should inform their children about the effects of bullying at home. The same applies to educators and community members (Epstein et al., 2018). These concepts are essential in this study because they highlight how schools can involve parents, educators, and the community in the fight against bullying. The authors’ observation is that counteractive mechanisms for bullying are not inclusive; therefore, they conclude that the efficacy of the mentioned interventions cannot be guaranteed because the culprits do not directly participate in implementing the rules.

Hall, W. J., & Chapman, M. V. (2018). The role of school context in implementing a statewide anti-bullying policy and protecting students. Educational Policy, 32(4), 507-539. Web.

Motivation is an integral tool in promoting organizational justice in an institution. Hall &Chapman (2018) provide a framework on the involvement of schools in motivating educators to enforce rules and interventions that eradicates bullying, similar to what De Luca et al. (2019) suggested. These authors indicate that schools should consider the welfare of their educators, such as teachers’ protection, when they suspend students exhibiting problem behaviors so that educators can enforce the anti-bullying policies without fear (Hall & Chapman 2018). The article includes an on-site study that justifies the need for educators to be protected and supported when they implement the policies in school.

However, a significant weakness detected is the insufficient sample size to represent the majority of the population for the data used. Lastly, the article concludes by advising the reader that motivation is essential and can bring radical change because it is an inclusive strategy that can help facilitate change. Unlike Hall & Chapman (2018), Patchin, & Hinduja (2018), mentions that corporal punishment for all the involved culprits is a way to eradicate bullying. The article notes that any child caught abusing another in any way should be severely punished by the person who witnessed the bullying. If it is a parent, there is no need to wait for the approval. One should take the bold step and punish the offender either by severe reprimand or any disciplinary action deemed fit.

Hale, R., Fox, C. L., & Murray, M. (2017). “As a parent, you become a tiger”: Parents talking about bullying at school. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 26(7), 2000-2015. Web.

Schools should provide parents with an opportunity to talk about bullying. According to Hale et al. (2019), parents are important figures in the lives of the children and have equal influence in promoting change. Therefore, they should be encouraged to come to school and talk to the students about the dangers of bullying. However, van et al. (2019) refutes this claim suggesting that training is the best intervention. This article is integral to this topic because it provides an alternative that schools can apply to engage the parent in anti-bullying intervention. The article concludes by offering guidelines on speaking up when bullying occurs. One step is reporting to authorities, speaking up without fear while recording the injustice, so all bullying incidences are documented and not ignored. The report is recent, with data retrieved from contemporary and varied sources to support this claim (Hale et al., 2019). Unfortunately, the author does not consider parents who are unaware of bullying, which is a limitation noted.

Gaffney, H., Farrington, D. P., & Ttofi, M. M. (2019). Examining the effectiveness of school-bullying intervention programs globally: A meta-analysis. International Journal of Bullying Prevention, 1(1), 14-31. Web.

In their analysis of the available anti-bullying intervention program, Gaffney et al. (2019) examined how the interventions are implemented in different states globally. They discovered that the US has the best school-based programs for counteracting bullying. For instance, no trap is an intervention that utilizes the peer-led approach to combat bullying in school. This program is inclusive because teachers, parents, and the community can implement it on their students to become pioneers of change by understanding bullying and the available counteractive mechanisms (Gaffney et al.,2019). The research is validated because it is peer-reviewed, and no limitations are identified. The final take points are that the US is among the best players in the strategic implementation of modernized techniques and should be at the forefront in this war.

Graham, S. (2016). Victims of bullying in schools. Theory into Practice, 55(2), 136-144. Web.

Graham (2016) introduces the need for everyone to join the war against bullying in schools. The article provides the effects of bullying on the victim by mentioning that the victim suffers from adverse physical health, depression, and low academic achievements. The article also provides the strategies to ensure bullying is eradicated in schools. Some of the interventions mentioned include creating awareness on the disadvantages of bullying, encouraging parents and the community to participate in the war against bullying, setting rules and expectations (Graham, 2016). This article is helpful for this study because it highlights the interventions people can use to encourage people to fight against bullying by illustrating its adverse impacts on victims. The final message from Graham (2016) is that the bullying scars never heal, which may have adverse health and physical consequences on the individual bullied in school.

McMullen, J. M., George, M., Ingman, B. C., Pulling Kuhn, A., Graham, D. J., & Carson, R. L. (2020). A systematic review of community engagement outcomes research in school‐based health interventions. Journal of School Health, 90(12), 985-994. Web.

The authors introduce the need for the community to be actively engaged in school-based interventions through an inclusive school system. Also, they provide an approach to community engagement whereby they suggest that schools have an inclusive system that is not biased to enable every concerned individual to participate in the school improvement initiative (McMullen et al., 2020). For instance, these authors recommend that schools collaborate with the community by providing volunteer positions for people to offer services to the school at no cost (McMullen et al., 2020). Through this connection, the school can train people through inclusive training to help fight against bullying by reporting cases to prevent reoccurrence. This article is integral for this study since it addresses how the community can eradicate bullying. Finally, McMullen et al. (2020) rest their case by encouraging everyone to be proactive in making the needed change because there is power in a large population working for the same purpose. While they advocate for an inclusive engagement, Cross et al. (2018) consider that parents are the only ones who can stop this menace because they know their children by heart. Therefore, they can implement measures that will force the children to abide by the stipulated rules to ensure that their interaction with others is not abusive.

Menesini, E., & Salmivalli, C. (2017). Bullying in schools: the state of knowledge and effective interventions. Psychology, health & medicine, 22(sup1), 240-253. Web.

In this article, Menesini & Salmivalli (2017) provide an intensive definition of bullying by illustrating its history and how it is considered a harmful act. The duo defines bullying as an act of harassment, intimidation, or aggressive intentional action imposed on individuals considered to be defenseless. They provide three relevant principles that qualify aggressive behavior as bullying. The criteria include repetition, imbalance of power, and intentionality. Menesini & Salmivalli (2017) apply qualitative analysis to determine the data on the reported cases of bullying. They analyze data from surveys done by the anti-bullying agencies, such as the global school health survey. One limitation in this analysis is that the data used are outdated, considering the statistics used are more than ten years old. The final message in the article is that bullying is prevalent and is to blame for the many mortality cases witnessed in the country.

Van Niejenhuis, C., Huitsing, G., & Veenstra, R. (2020). Working with parents to counteract bullying: A randomized controlled trial of an intervention to improve parent‐school cooperation. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 61(1), 117-131. Web.

The article provides ways parents can be involved in preventing bullying in school. First, Van et al. (2020) explain that parents can be applied in bullying prevention through training. Second, the authors introduce when this training can take place, considering that the availability of parents can be a limitation. Third, they suggest that taking advantage of the parents meeting to train parents on the effects of bullying and counteractive strategies to eradicate bullying is a significant consideration (Van et al.,2020). They advise that parents can participate in bullying prevention in parent-focused classes through training on ways to deal with bullying when they witness it happening. This article is unique because it provides one viable mechanism to involve parents in an anti-bullying intervention. The final message is that the war against bullying is manageable when parents are concerned because they are crucial in instilling morals. Unlike Van et al. (2020), Kupchik & Farina (2016) explain that students should also be encouraged to help in the war against bullying. They are the ones who witness the bullying, and they know who the bullies, therefore, they can be integral in helping curb these behaviors in schools through reporting offenders to teachers, parents, or local authorities.

Karikari, I., Brown, J. R., Ashirifi, G. D., & Storms, J. (2020). Bullying prevention in schools: The need for a multiple stakeholder approach. Advances in Social Work, 20(1), 61-81. Web.

Schools should sensitize educators, teachers, and the community of their responsibility in fighting against bullying. For instance, teachers should be reminded that they are in charge of their students during school meetings, meaning that they should consistently implement the stipulated anti-bullying guidelines (Karikari et al.,2020). The school can also print posters or brochures advising the public on dealing with bullying whenever they witness it. The article lists the role schools should play in reducing bullying in school. This source is credible since it is peer-reviewed and integral for this study because it provides various strategies for enhancing the war against bullying. The message from these authors is that teachers or educators can be sensitized on ways to deal with bullying by supporting, sponsoring, and engaging in counteractive interventions to ensure that the adopted strategies are effective in creating change.

References

Bosworth, K., Garcia, R., Judkins, M., & Saliba, M. (2018). The impact of leadership involvement in enhancing high school climate and reducing bullying: An exploratory study. Journal of school violence, 17(3), 354-366. Web.

Cross, D., Lester, L., Pearce, N., Barnes, A., & Beatty, S. (2018). A group randomized controlled trial evaluating parent involvement in whole-school actions to reduce bullying. The Journal of Educational Research, 111(3), 255-267. Web.

De Luca, L., Nocentini, A., & Menesini, E. (2019). The teacher’s role in preventing bullying. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, 1830. Web.

Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Sheldon, S. B., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Williams, K. J. (2018). School, family, and community partnerships: Your handbook for action. Corwin Press.

Hall, W. J., & Chapman, M. V. (2018). The role of school context in implementing a statewide anti-bullying policy and protecting students. Educational Policy, 32(4), 507-539. Web.

Hale, R., Fox, C. L., & Murray, M. (2017). “As a parent, you become a tiger”: Parents talking about bullying at school. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 26(7), 2000-2015. Web.

Gaffney, H., Farrington, D. P., & Ttofi, M. M. (2019). Examining the effectiveness of school-bullying intervention programs globally: A meta-analysis. International Journal of Bullying Prevention, 1(1), 14-31. Web.

Graham, S. (2016). Victims of bullying in schools. Theory into Practice, 55(2), 136-144. Web.

Kupchik, A., & Farina, K. A. (2016). Imitating authority: Students’ perceptions of school punishment and security, and bullying victimization. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, 14(2), 147-163.

McMullen, J. M., George, M., Ingman, B. C., Pulling Kuhn, A., Graham, D. J., & Carson, R. L. (2020). A systematic review of community engagement outcomes research in school‐based health interventions. Journal of School Health, 90(12), 985-994. Web.

Menesini, E., & Salmivalli, C. (2017). Bullying in schools: the state of knowledge and effective interventions. Psychology, health & medicine, 22(sup1), 240-253. Web.

Patchin, J. W., & Hinduja, S. (2018). Deterring teen bullying: Assessing the impact of perceived punishment from police, schools, and parents. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, 16(2), 190-207.

Van Niejenhuis, C., Huitsing, G., & Veenstra, R. (2020). Working with parents to counteract bullying: A randomized controlled trial of an intervention to improve parent‐school cooperation. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 61(1), 117-131. Web.

Karikari, I., Brown, J. R., Ashirifi, G. D., & Storms, J. (2020). Bullying prevention in schools: The need for a multiple stakeholder approach. Advances in Social Work, 20(1), 61-81. Web.

Make a reference

Pick a citation style

Reference

PapersGeeks. (2022, December 12). How Schools Can Involve Stakeholders in Reducing Bullying. Retrieved from https://papersgeeks.com/how-schools-can-involve-stakeholders-in-reducing-bullying/

Work Cited

"How Schools Can Involve Stakeholders in Reducing Bullying." PapersGeeks, 12 Dec. 2022, papersgeeks.com/how-schools-can-involve-stakeholders-in-reducing-bullying/.

1. PapersGeeks. "How Schools Can Involve Stakeholders in Reducing Bullying." December 12, 2022. https://papersgeeks.com/how-schools-can-involve-stakeholders-in-reducing-bullying/.


Bibliography


PapersGeeks. "How Schools Can Involve Stakeholders in Reducing Bullying." December 12, 2022. https://papersgeeks.com/how-schools-can-involve-stakeholders-in-reducing-bullying/.

References

PapersGeeks. 2022. "How Schools Can Involve Stakeholders in Reducing Bullying." December 12, 2022. https://papersgeeks.com/how-schools-can-involve-stakeholders-in-reducing-bullying/.

References

PapersGeeks. (2022) 'How Schools Can Involve Stakeholders in Reducing Bullying'. 12 December.

Click to copy

This paper on How Schools Can Involve Stakeholders in Reducing Bullying was created by a student just like you. You are allowed to use this work for academic purposes. If you wish to use a snippet from the sample in your paper, a proper citation is required.

Takedown Request

If you created this work and want to delete it from the PapersGeeks database, send a removal request.