Literature Paper Samples

The Book “The Tortilla Curtain” by Thomas Coraghessan Boyle

The book The Tortilla Curtain, written by Thomas Coraghessan Boyle, is a story of two couples with massively different origins and challenges. The story intricately reveals how each couple views others, which enriches the overall perspectives offered by the author. The given collision analysis will primarily focus on familial and...

American Notion of Work in Melville’s Bartleby, the Scrivener

Bartleby, the Scrivener by Herman Melville, is a complex, intellectually dense story about the basis of compassion, the transparency of other individuals, and the way confederate social constraints increased concerns about humankind’s metaphysical equivalence. Readers have stressed Bartleby as a representation of incomprehensibility, of the final openness of language or...

Masculine and Feminine Heroic Plots

Heroic tales and legends of the Middle Ages are now thought to have been completely masculine. However, it would be wrong to consider all works of this genre identical as long as there existed different target audiences who wanted different characters. For instance, the French epic The Song of Roland...

Dramatic Devices in A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen

The play A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen premiered at the end of the nineteenth century and evoked a heated debate. Although it seemed a feminist play, the author stressed that he did not intend to explore the associated themes. Nonetheless, his renowned work unveils diverse issues females have faced...

Sonnet 3 by Petrarch and Decameron by Boccaccio

The Renaissance, a period in European history that marked the transition from the Middle Ages to modernity, was characterized by moving from religious dogmas to a more human-centered approach to philosophy, literature, and art and a revived interest in Greco-Roman legacy. It is traditionally considered that the Renaissance reached its...

“Success is Counted Sweetest” by Emily Dickinson

Introduction Emily Dickinson is presently regarded as one of the most prominent and fruitful American poets that ever exist, even though the world saw only about ten of her poems during her life. Although Emily Dickinson led a calm and secluded lifestyle, she was, at the same time, vividly interested...

“Sonny’s Blues” by James Baldwin

The story Sonny’s Blues, written by James Baldwin, is narrated by an African-American man working as an algebra teacher, whose name is not revealed by the author. At the beginning of the story, the narrator is worried after reading the newspaper, from which he finds out that his brother, Sonny,...

“Shiloh” by Bobbie Ann Mason: Female Empowerment

Many literary works reflect real-life events in a compelling and relatable manner. A short story Shiloh by Bobbie Ann Mason is an exemplary piece of literature since, through the narration of the main character’s transformation, the author portrays a broken marriage and encourages female self-empowerment. Norma Jean is a character...

Analysis of Margaret Atwood’s “Happy Endings”

Margaret Atwood’s “Happy Endings” represents a unique literary work, as it raises multiple issues and challenges numerous standards and writing rules in just a few paragraphs. The author admits that in the beginning, she did not know what kind of story she was writing. Moreover, readers can only guess what...

“Soldier’s Home” by Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway’s short story “Soldier’s Home” focuses on the setting of an average town somewhere in Oklahoma. It is the early 1920 and the protagonist, Harold Krebs, returns home from World War I almost two years after its end, and such a late arrival plays an essential role in his...

“Oedipus the King” by Sophocles Review

The play takes place in Thebes, a city-state in ancient Greece (Sophocles wrote it in 429 BC.). Despite the fact that there is a day, the weather may be gloomy in order to emphasize the disaster affecting the city. The tragedy started in front of Oedipus’s palace where suffering and...

“Everyday Use” and Feminism

Introduction The community places too much work on the shoulders of African women. African-American women face more pressure with the need to fit in their communities and raise healthy families amidst the challenges such as poverty, crime, and being looked down upon. Alice Walker’s narrative “Everyday Use” is one of...

The Family Problem in “A Doll House”

Introduction A Doll House, written by Henrik Ibsen in 1879, is rightful of the most exciting dramas about women’s happiness. Many kinds of people were introduced throughout the whole drama. While the drama is not significant in size, the actions change so dramatically. As a result, many people fail to...

Play “Trifles”: Significance of Symbols

The play by Glaspell is characterized by a variety of significant miseries and categorical contradictions surrounding the lives of married women. The bird in this contest represents the solitary life of Minnie after getting married to Mr. Wright (Glaspell, 2010). The author compares this engagement to a caged canary and...

The Racial Question in American Poetry

An in-depth study of the social mechanisms and driving forces shaping the development of American poetry is an intriguing academic question. More specifically, this strand allows not only to form a coherent system of rhetorical and semantic meanings peculiar to U.S. poetic culture but also to identify relevant historical traditions...

Antigone: Tragedy and Film

Antigone, an ancient Greek tragedy written by Sophocles around 442 BC, remains a source of inspiration for multiple play-writers, artists, and filmmakers. It addresses the theme of the internal power of gods and the worldliness of people’s power, the conflict between natural law and governmental one, the significance of justice,...

“Wave”: Safety and Not Taking Chances

Wave is a short story about Ray, Alma, and the waving man. When Ray is going to work, he passes by a house where a man is sitting on the porch waving at people who pass by. This experience intrigues him because at one time he feels guilty when he...

“Lost in the Kitchen” Overview

Humor is a potent tool that helps people to speak about important things in an unserious manner. Dave Barry, in his essay “Lost in the Kitchen,” laughs at typical stereotypes lined with men and female behaviors and traditional occupations. The whole story starts with the phrase that sets a tone...

Susan Cain’s “Quiet” Academic Book Review

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking is a book by Susan Cain published in 2012 where she expresses her point of view that introverts would efficiently occupy leading positions and are generally underestimated in society. Susan Cain is an American lecturer and writer. The...